What is a Brand Persona?

What is a Brand Persona?

Your brand persona is a valuable thing that will help you build trust with customers. If you were to weave together all of your values, activities, and interests, they would create a multifaceted gem that defines you as a person.

But suppose you meet a potential customer in an elevator, and you want to shine? You want them to remember you. They will probably only remember one or two things about you. What would you want those things to be?

This is what brand persona is all about. If you want people to remember you, by all means, capture everything that defines you. Then, go the next step.

If you are an author, artist or businessperson, your work defines you to a great extent, but also the realm in which you work or the subject matter on which you focus. Add to that your activities. For instance, are you a runner? An equestrian? A motocross enthusiast? Do you love to cook, read, dance? And then there are societal interests like improving literacy, reducing poverty, protecting the environment, and so on. Take the time to write it all down. You’ll be surprised how illuminating it can be, and how few people actually do it.

Next, narrow down your list to a handful of things. Consider the top 10 that you might converse about with your new acquaintance. In other words, which things do you think others can most easily relate to?

In most cases, people relate to values. They may not care much about what you do or how you do it, but if you talk about why you do it, what drives you, you’re likely to pique their interest. People are attracted to passion. If you only have 30 seconds before the two of you shake hands and say goodbye, wouldn’t you like to tell them about your greatest passion?

That’s how a defined persona can help, by making your most memorable facets easier to communicate and, therefore, easier to remember. Once your persona is defined, what’s next?

 

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Hey Y'all: A Big Welcome to Amelia Indie Authors

Hey Y’all

Welcome to Amelia Indie Authors, a membership co-op for authors committed to quality through collaboration. Feel free to wander around our site but watch your step: we’re still under construction. Until we’re fully operational, feel free to email us with any questions, comments or ideas you want to share. That address is Amelia.Indie.Authors@gmail.com 

 

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More Than Ever

More Than Ever

“What author inspired you the most while growing up?” This question was posed to me by a critically-acclaimed writer and professor on my first day of graduate school. I was sitting in an old classroom in an old college in an old Southern town. The other students all responded to the question with very “literary” answers: William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Jane Austen.

I answered with, “Judy Blume“.

In the world of literary fiction, writing for and about teenagers can often result in a steadfast stigma, labeling you forever as “the one who writes the teen stuff.” For some reason, our work is often not taken as seriously as our grown-up, elite counterparts. We get grouped in with other categories muttered with similar lowly disdain such as “chick lit”, “beach books”, and “anything written by that Nora Roberts woman”.

I’m often quick to point out 27 books by Nora Roberts are sold every minute. And Judy Blume’s books have been translated into 31 languages and over 80 million copies have been sold…and counting.

Not bad company to be in if you ask me.

Yet, selling a gazillion copies is not my driving force as a young adult author. I write for teenagers simply because I love to.

I write for teenagers because when I was 13 years old, a woman named Norma Fox Mazer changed my life.

Just weeks after experiencing my first kiss with a Latin boy named Pedro (after he slipped me a crumpled note that read, “Meet me after school because I like your stories”), my eighth grade world was lit on fire when it was announced Norma Fox Mazer – one of my favorite authors – would be making a guest appearance at our school.

After some serious campaigning to the junior high powers that be, I was one of the few students selected to have lunch with her in the library. I was beyond thrilled, having read every book she’d written. Although I was terribly star struck, I bravely showed her a section of a short story I was working on at the time and told her how much I wanted to be a writer.

Norma Fox Mazer scanned the first page and informed me, “You already are.”

Two years later, I published my first short story. And the rest, as they say, is history.

But I never would have become a young adult author without first being a young adult reader.

Norma Fox Mazer was my best friend, without even realizing it. Each step of the way, she was there for me, guiding me through the field of adolescent landmines. She helped me cope with my parent’s divorce with Taking Terri Mueller. She taught me about death and grieving in After the Rain. She let me know that it was okay to not live like the rich kids in Silver. And she answered the questions I was too embarrassed to ask in Up in Seth’s Room.

Similarly, I learned valuable life lessons in every Judy Blume book I could get my hands on (particularly Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself and Then Again, Maybe I Won’t). I devoured every volume in the Nancy Drew series. I hung on every suspenseful word written by Lois Duncan, and later, Christopher Pike.

Yet, as much as I read and loved each book by these authors, I could never find a true version of myself in them: a young gay boy growing up in the conservative 80s in northern California.

My first young adult novel, (set in 1986 in Sacramento), has just been published by Bold Strokes Books. While the novel explores a very timely and important topic (the life of a young girl is deeply affected by the murder of her gay older brother), the book is truly a literary tribute to the young adult authors who made me the writer I am today. Without them – and their beautiful words – I never would have sat down and taught myself to type at the age of 13.

I wouldn’t be able to recognize how much weight our words as writers carry, especially when read by young people.

Teenagers need us now, more than ever. They want us to be their best friend, their older brother or sister, their confidant. They want our experiences: the choices we made or didn’t, the decisions we’ve never second-guessed, the regrets we’ll always have. It is imperative that we share our lives with young people – not just through our words, but also by example.

After hearing Norma Fox Mazer had passed away last October, I reached out to her daughter, Anne, who is a successful writer. In a letter, I recalled my eighth-grade memory of her mother in my junior high library, and of the tremendous influence she’d had on my career since.

In her response, Anne shared with me, “I was touched to hear the story about how you met my mother. She would have been so happy to hear from you again and to learn about your novel.”

In my heart, I will always carry Anne’s words, right beside her mother’s. Right next to Judy Blume’s, and Lois Duncan’s and Christopher Pike’s. Next to the characters and the stories that helped to shape my youth.

In my lifetime, I only hope my own words will one day resonate with a 13-year-old who has yet to be told, “You already are.”

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This article was originally published here.

 

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Clutter and the Lizard Brain

Clutter and the Lizard Brain

Once upon a time, I was a single mother. I worked in human services (not the biggest ticket salary out there) and received almost none of the child support that had been ordered by the court. (Yes,  I could have taken all sort of steps to collect but, at the time, he wasn’t around  and that made life much safer and more peaceful for all concerned.)

Maybe Someone Will Need This

Unfortunately, I got really good at worrying about money. I developed a highly trained scarcity mentality. PhD-level. Despite changed circumstances, sometimes it’s still hard to get rid of “stuff” without thinking “maybe someone will need this someday.” (Not even “maybe I will need it” but “someone.”) Those thoughts were particularly loud and obnoxious when I got married and merged two complete households. They cropped up again when we sold our home and prepared to move to the other end of the country.

At the risk of sounding like a hoarder, I’ve learned to turn down the volume of those thoughts.  The simplest, least stressful strategy I’ve found is a multi-step process. First, I put “stuff” into a big storage box. Then I close it up and notice whether or not I go looking for any of its contents. Most of the time the answer is “no” and I am grateful to drop it off at the thrift store that supports our local domestic violence shelter.

Those thoughts were particularly obnoxious when I got married... Click To Tweet

Not long ago, I was on the phone with a friend, talking a little about this process. He’s much better at it than I am and had an observation about why it can be so difficult for people to start the process of off-loading excess.

“Your lizard brain hates loss. It loves stuff. Lots and lots of stuff.”

Your Lizard Hates Loss

Duh.  I know this.  Hanging on to excess stuff is about survival… about having “enough” to live. And it doesn’t matter that the “need” doesn’t exist. It’s only a perception.  An important part of clearing clutter is to make sure we’re not seeing it as a loss.

It doesn't matter that the need isn't real. Click To Tweet

Living better with less is a mindset… and sometimes we need to remind that little lizard between our ears that our survival is not at stake. Take small steps. There is no end. Gratitude for the abundance in our lives. There’s no hurry… it’s a way of life.

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This post originally appeared here.